Theory for Producers

The Black Keys

Music theory doesn't have to be a bad word. We're starting with the one scale to rule them all.

45-60 Minutes
6 Sections

A course created in partnership with

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Theory. It’s a word that has forced so many people to stop studying music — or retreat to our bedrooms where we could make digital sounds that were never wrong. But theory is awesome if you give it a chance. It gives you a set of tools that can widen your palate and increase your appreciation for the beauty and complexity of the music you make and listen to.

The goal of this course is to give you some basic theory knowledge by learning some amazing songs that illustrate each concept. For each idea, we’ll feature a song that brings that idea to life — and challenge you to use the concept in your own work. 

This course was created in partnership with NYU's MusEDLab. Visit their site to learn more about their terrific work!


Ethan 04

Ethan Hein

Adjunct Professor, Guitarist, Theory Nerd

Ethan Hein is an adjunct professor of music technology at NYU and Montclair State University, and a founding member of the NYU Music Experience Design Lab, under the leadership of Alex Ruthmann.

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beginner
theory for producers
music theory
production

Course Outline

  1. Section 1

    Introduction

  2. Section 2

    "Superstition"

  3. Section 3

    "Latch"

  4. Section 4

    “Electric Feel”

  5. Section 5

    "Flashlight"

  6. Section 6

    Discussion

MORE INFORMATION

Who is this course for? 

This course was created specifically with producers in mind, but it could be helpful for any musician looking for a better grasp on music theory. Specifically, we use the piano roll that you mind find in a digital audio workstation such as Ableton Live or Logic to illustrate certain concepts. 

What can I expect to get out of this course?

By the end of this mini-course, you'll have a solid grasp and understanding of one of the most common scales in use today: the pentatonic. You should be able to use the scale to make your own grooves and melodies, and potentially even identify it in songs you hear. 

What's next in this series?

We're currently hard at work on the second installment of this series called "The White Keys" in which we examine some other scales found in popular music of all types. We'll email you when it's published!